Radiometric dating dinosaur bones

In the case of radiocarbon dating, the half-life of carbon 14 is 5,730 years.This half life is a relatively small number, which means that carbon 14 dating is not particularly helpful for very recent deaths and deaths more than 50,000 years ago.Until recent years, scientists who believe in creation haven't had the necessary resources to explore radiometric dating in detail.A 10 gram sample of U-238Now that has changed, and some important discoveries are being made. With a half-life of only 5730 years, carbon-14 dating has nothing to do with dating the geological ages! Hovind is confusing the carbon-14 "clock" with other radiometric "clocks." The only thing in the geologic record which has anything to do with calibrating carbon-14 dating is the coal from the Carboniferous Period.Being ancient, the C-14 content has long since decayed away and that makes it useful in "zeroing" laboratory instruments. Hovind would take the trouble to do a little reading from something other than creationist publications he would not make such an outrageous statement.When granite rock hardens, it freezes radioactive elements in place.The most common radioactive element in granite is Uranium-238.

The half-life of a radioactive isotope describes the amount of time that it takes half of the isotope in a sample to decay.

This element is locked in tiny zircons within the granite. While it stays within the zircon for a period of time, being a very small atom, helium escapes the zircon within a few thousand years.

When creation scientists studied granite samples, they made interesting discoveries.

It is buried alive by the scientific establishment.

As Cuozzo says, this is natural selection in the most literal sense!

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